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Just the Facts! 2014 Workshop Series
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"For years Senator [Lamar] Alexander has literally held up the current ten-page FAFSA taped together, arguing that such undue complexity reduces college access," New America's EdCentral reports.

"If you listen to all the commotion, you would think that the level of college debt in the U.S. today is a crisis of epic proportion—hundreds of thousands of unfortunate young people leaving college with crushing loan debt. The facts might surprise you," Lucie Lapovsky writes in a Forbes opinion piece.
"In a time of frantic calls to raise the number of Americans with university degrees who will be needed to feed the globally competitive knowledge economy, only two states – North Dakota and Alaska – have increased spending per student on higher education, when adjusted for inflation, since the economic downturn, according to the independent Center on Budget and Policy Priorities," according to U.S. News and World Report.
"Patrick Wright is $32,000 in debt despite a Regents Scholarship that pays for his tuition," the Daily Nebraskan reports. "The average debt for UNL undergraduates post-graduation is $20,567. But the average indebtedness data can be misleading, said Craig Munier, director of the UNL Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid [and former NASFAA National Chair]."
"Dianne Cox knows people who'd rather do their income taxes than fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), a 108-question form that needs to be filed annually for college students to get most kinds of financial aid," The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports.
"Not every college education is created equal, and it should come as no surprise that Colorado children from the lowest-income families are the least likely to go to the best colleges," according to an editorial from The Denver Post.
"If you’re a shoestring start-up trying to get noticed in an enormous industry, there’s nothing that helps more than having big players try to ban you. But from financial services to airlines, the pattern repeats itself again and again, as the lumbering giants seek to destroy rather than cooperate," The New York TimesYour Money reports.
"I fear many student loan borrowers are flunking out when it comes to choosing the right repayment plan. Here's a quick quiz to test your repayment smarts," Suze Orman writes on her show's MSNBC blog.
The NASFAA Board of Directors recently approved a $5 increase to the base dues fee for the 2015-16 year, increasing the base fee from $825 to $830, and a .004 increase to the FTE multiplier from .085 to .089. This increase is less than average historical dues increases. It is being announced nearly eight months prior to the start of the fiscal year (July 1, 2015) to give schools sufficient time to plan accordingly.
"In its latest Survey of Young Workers, the Federal Reserve said educational programs should be aligned with the needs of the labor market for students to get the most out of their education," The Washington Post reports.
"Recent news coverage has highlighted the fact that many colleges with great wealth are not enrolling many needy students, while a number of relatively nonwealthy colleges are," Raynard S. Kington writes for The Chronicle of Higher Education.
This Thanksgiving season, NASFAA staff weighed in on why we are thankful for you, our members – this week and every other day of the year.
"Students at Rhode Island’s three public colleges could see their first tuition hike in three years under a budget unanimously approved Wednesday night by the Council on Postsecondary Education," the Providence Journal reports.
"Two of the biggest private student loan providers have welcome news for struggling grads: Soon, some distressed borrowers will be eligible for lower interest rates and lower monthly payments," Time reports. "'With federal loans, you have built-in insurance in case of job loss or disability or death,' says Justin Draeger, president of [NASFAA]. 'These are protections provided to every borrower. Those protections don’t always exist in the private student loan market.'"

"When it comes to advocating for greater reliance on public benefits for low-income individuals, the idea is already a tough political sell among anti-entitlement elected officials and segments of the electorate that view the benefits as handouts," Diverse: Issues in Higher Education reports.

 
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