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Upcoming Events

Just the Facts! 2014 Workshop Series
Click here to learn more about this comprehensive training series for new financial aid professionals. Registration is open!


2014 MASFAA Conference
The excitement of the fall semester beginning is in the air! What else is in the air? More info on the MASFAA website about the annual conference including hotel information and the agenda! I would encourage you to take a look and make your reservations soon this conference is not to be missed! When: Nov. 13 - 14 - Where: The UMass Lowell Inn and Conference Center at 50 Warren St., Lowell, MA 01852- Click above for more info!


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"Next month [The New York Times] plans to unveil 'a new ranking of colleges and universities based on their ability to attract underprivileged kids,'" The Chronicle of Higher Education reports.
"If you’re a high school student whose parents make a combined $40,000 a year, you may think you don’t have even a remote chance of being able to afford an elite, ultra-high-priced college like Harvard, Princeton or Stanford. But those schools have such large endowments ($32 billion, in Harvard’s case), coupled with a commitment to making college affordable for any applicant who can overcome their challenging admissions requirements, that students from low-income households can expect to pay a fraction of the schools’ sticker price of around $60,000," according to Forbes.
Sept. 2, 2014 - At the request of Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, NASFAA submitted comments on the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEAA). The discussion draft, released in June 2014, serves as a marker for future reauthorization efforts. NASFAA’s comments outline areas of support and concern with the goal of informing the final legislation that Congress will continue to work toward next year.

"Consumer Reports reviewed campus banking products offered by nine financial companies to compare their terms and calculate their costs," according to The Chronicle of Higher Education's The Ticker blog.

"The U.S. Department of Education on Friday announced it had renegotiated its contracts with federal student-loan servicers, giving them more incentives to keep borrowers from defaulting on their loans," according to The Chronicle of Higher Education's The Ticker blog. 

 
"A new report finds that most universities aren’t offering students enough help in understanding the financial burden posed by student loans," The Associated Press reports.
"Iowa authorities are suing the La' James chain of cosmetology schools, contending the schools systematically defraud students and leave them so frustrated that they often quit before graduating," The Des Moines Register reports.
"Oregon Coast Community College in Newport has regained accreditation by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, officials said Thursday," The Oregonian reports.
As you read this blog post I will most likely be heading into the NASFAA office for my last day as the Dallas Martin Fund for Education (DME) Intern. This internship offered the opportunity for me to attend meetings on Capitol Hill, write articles that were featured in Today’s News, provide survey data for webinars, edit the 2014 NASFAA National Profile, create presentations to be used by the Policy team, and much more. My time with here with NASFAA has been an invaluable experience that I will cherish and look back to for many years to come.

"Few magazine editors—myself included—can resist a dash of apocalypse in a cover line, which is why I don't fault writer Graeme Wood for the question on the front of this month’s Atlantic: 'Is College Doomed?' I'll answer that question anyway: no," Judith Shulevitz writes for the New Republic

 

08/28/14 - Anthem Bows Out
"After years of enrollment losses, Anthem Education, a for-profit chain of colleges and career institutes, filed for bankruptcy Monday," Inside Higher Ed reports.
"A proposal by a Utah lawmaker would offer tuition incentives for completing a bachelor's degree in four years and potentially cover the cost of tuition if a student is forced to enroll for more than eight semesters," the Deseret News reports.
"At his high school in Tukwila, Washington, [Isaac] Silwal was introduced to Summer Search, a national nonprofit that partners with high schools in seven urban areas on the east and west coasts," Diverse: Issues in Higher Education reports.

"Bruce Braley is using visits to college campuses this week to draw a contrast between himself and U.S. Senate campaign opponent Joni Ernst on higher education access and affordability," The Des Moines Register reports.

 

"The federal stimulus law of 2009 had a maintenance-of-effort provision that required states to hold steady the amount they appropriated for public colleges, [according to 'The Role of State Policy in Promoting College Affordability']," The Chronicle of Higher Education's The Ticker blog reports.
 
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